Myofibril remodeling as opposed to myofibril damage in DOMS

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Myofibril remodeling as opposed to myofibril damage in DOMS

Postby Dtlv74 on Sun Dec 27, 2009 1:08 pm

Has always been considered that DOMS is triggered by muscle damage from training, but this study suggests that it's not the damage that causes DOMS but the adaptive process itself. Doesn't mean that you need DOMS to grow, we all know this isn't true, but interesting none the less.

Evidence for myofibril remodeling as opposed to myofibril damage in human muscles with DOMS: an ultrastructural and immunoelectron microscopic study.

Yu JG, Carlsson L, Thornell LE.

Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Section for Anatomy, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.

The myofibrillar and cytoskeletal alterations observed in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) caused by eccentric exercise are generally considered to represent damage. By contrast our recent immunohistochemical studies suggested that the alterations reflect myofibrillar remodeling (Yu and Thornell 2002; Yu et al. 2003). In the present study the same human muscle biopsies were further analyzed with transmission electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. We show that the ultrastructural hallmarks of DOMS, Z-disc streaming, Z-disc smearing, and Z-disc disruption were present in the biopsies and were significantly more frequent in biopsies taken 2-3 days and 7-8 days after exercise than in those from controls and 1 h after exercise. Four main types of changes were observed: amorphous widened Z-discs, amorphous sarcomeres, double Z-discs, and supernumerary sarcomeres. We confirm by immunoelectron microscopy that the main Z-disc protein alpha-actinin is not present in Z-disc alterations or in the links of electron-dense material between Z-discs in longitudinal register. These alterations were related to an increase of F-actin and desmin, where F-actin was present within the strands of amorphous material. Desmin, on the other hand, was seen in less dense regions of the alterations. Our results strongly support that the myofibrillar and cytoskeletal alterations, considered to be the hallmarks of DOMS, reflect an adaptive remodeling of the myofibrils.

Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1499 ... t=Abstract
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Re: Myofibril remodeling as opposed to myofibril damage in DOMS

Postby Alex on Sun Dec 27, 2009 1:52 pm

I always figured that the repair process is the cause of certain aches and pains due mainly to the delay at which time they commence.
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Re: Myofibril remodeling as opposed to myofibril damage in DOMS

Postby Dtlv74 on Sun Dec 27, 2009 3:37 pm

Yes it makes sense that delayed sensations ae the result of things starting to happen. Many people don't have a clue though - was speaking to someone a few weeks back who has been training for around three years and still thinks DOMS is lactic acid build up. :?
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Re: Myofibril remodeling as opposed to myofibril damage in DOMS

Postby health4ni on Tue Jan 05, 2010 10:51 am

^^ well, I think that lactic acid does play a part in the "pain". Lactic acid crystals hang around in the blood and thus the muscle tissue after training; and even if you are not sore at all they'll still be some (albeit less) hanging around. I do think it has an effect. When I got my bloods done last year I trained the day before and there were lactic acid crystals in my blood.
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